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How to use Word’s readability stats to improve your legal writing

It’s generally accepted that good legal writing is concise writing. It’s not always easy, though. It’s especially difficult in the legal field, where simplicity can get lost in an ocean of impenetrable jargon, superfluous triplicate phrases, and never-ending sentences. The result is often writing that’s hard work to read or […]

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How to stay sane when using track changes in Word

race track

If you work in a law office, then it’s a near certainty that you’re familiar with collaborating on documents using Word’s track changes features. Today, now that almost all legal writing involves some sort of collaboration, it’s a hugely valuable and useful tool. However, as the tangle of multi-colored markup […]

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How to correct OCR errors using Adobe Acrobat

How to correct OCR errors

Optical character recognition, usually abbreviated to just OCR, is the process of converting image files containing letters and words (such as scans or photographs) into searchable, text-based documents. Now that the eFiling rules in many states, for example in California and Texas, require that electronically filed submissions (including exhibits) be […]

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How to use Microsoft Word Styles (a guide for legal professionals)

A well-formatted and -presented legal document can go a long way toward enhancing readability. However, worrying about consistent formatting can seem trivial when it’s the content that really matters. If (like me) you’re a bit of a pedant for a consistently-presented document, then you may have spent a lot of […]

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